Manuka Doctor Apinourish Rejuvenating Face Mask with Bee Venom

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I’ve been pondering whether or not I want to try this product for a while now, after a little chat with British Beauty Blogger and a friend whose Mum is a beekeeping, pondering whether or not a product that uses Bee Venom is a nice thing to be playing with. The brands claim that the bee venom is collected humanely, but my concern is why would you want to put venom on your face?

Bee venom is being labelled as a alternative to Botox, so as a beauty blogger and beauty enthusiast I had to at least give it a try in the name of research. I’ve tried the Manuka Doctor Apinourish Rejuvaneting Face Mask with Bee Venom twice now, with these sachets.

Here’s the back of the pack so you can see what the claims of this product are.

The mask is a really unusual texture, it’s a white cream, so when you apply it, it feels like you are applying a thick face cream rather than a mask. I like this as it’s less mess and easy to apply, plus it doesn’t have a colour on the skin so you don’t have to look like a moron whilst you wait for it to work it’s magic. I was afraid it might feel stingy on the skin, but it is just a bit tingly. Obviously, if you are allergic to bee stings, hopefully you’ll realise not to use this at all! You will react.

It’s recommended to leave the mask on for between 15-30 minutes, although when I spoke to the Mauka Doctor representative at the Vitality show, she explained to me how she likes to keep it on over night sometimes. The mask sets to a clear, chalky finish, a bit like if you had toothpaste set on your face.

Once you’re done, you rub the mask off your face. This instruction sounds bizarre, but you’ll find that it flakes off, also like it would if it was toothpaste. Don’t tell me you know don’t know what that feels like, we’ve all done the toothpaste on a  spot trick! Anyway, it’s an odd experience, but I like it, feels like it’s scrubby away muck whilst you’re at it.

This mask claims to help with scars and signs of ageing and I would say that after too uses, my skin was soft, smooth and the scars on my forehead improved.

Retailing at £49.99 for a full size pot, this product is certainly a luxury for most. However, I would say it was worth a try. If you’re concerned about animal cruelty, I’m not convinced it’s 100% humane to bees, but I have no evidence.

Have you tried Manuka Doctor? What do you think of the Bee Venom ingredient?

Comment below or tweet me @JayneJRead

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2 thoughts on “Manuka Doctor Apinourish Rejuvenating Face Mask with Bee Venom

  1. I love this product very much, I’m using it at the moment as a part of my breakout routine (stress gets you nowhere but bad skin avenue!) and it does its job so well. I couldn’t afford a new pot at it’s RRP but if I could, I’d get it! Perhaps if its in the H&B Penny Sale then I’d get two pots for £50, which would be better! x

  2. To collect bee venom the bee must die.
    Which bees die? The old ones or the young ones ???
    About two years ago there was a virus that originated in Israel that just about decayed the world bee population. This was reported in Scientific American. Before the virus there were many bees around. The number of bees has not recovered. Now if we require bee venom for vanity sake where are the bees coming from in order to harvest the venom. Italy be thought that bees are worthless but they pollinate many vegetable plants, nuts and of course the flowers for perfume. So I say leave the bees alone and use something else.

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